The Boat

The Dream Boat: A 1984 Baba 30 (yes, we know we can't afford it!)

Ahhh….the boat.  This may be one of the most important purchases of our lives.  It’s more than a recreational vehicle, a transport mechanism or a place we sleep at night.  As we see it, it’s our new home.   To paraphrase a fellow sailor, it’s an object whose quality is directly correlated to our lifespan.  Pretty important.  Not surprisingly, we’ve devoted a considerable amount of the last six months researching the very complex topic of:

“What makes a seaworthy vessel?”  

We’ve compiled a list of items from our research, but as we continually state, we’re hoping to use this blog as a forum to disseminate information, but also to solicit comments and feedback from those folks out there with a more knowledge than ourselves.

Here is our current (not-so) short list of boats (an evolving process):

Alberg 30

Allied Seawind II 32 (also 30 Ketch)

Bayfield 30-32 (also 29 Cutter)

Bristol 29 (also 29.9 & 30)

Bristol 32 (also 30 SM)

Cape Dory 30 Cutter

Cape Dory 31 (also 32)

Challenger 32

Douglas 32

Ericson Independence 31

Mariah 31

Sea Sprite 30

Southern Cross 31 (also 32)

Tartan 30

Valiant 32

Vanguard 33

Willard 30

Yankee 30

 Besides being of high quality construction and trying to stay within our meager boat budget, here are some additional major criteria we’re looking for in a boat:

Hull

Interior

Rigging and Sails

Engine and Ground Tackle

Length:  29′ to 33′



Storage: Ample



Standing Rigging:  Newer Type:  Diesel
Displacement: 8,000 to 15,000 lbs Navigation:  dedicated table Primary Sails: Main w/ 3 reef points, working jib, genoa, Hours:  <1500 hours
Beam: >9′ Galley:  oven, icebox, foot pump Spare Sails: Spare main Size:  3HP/ton
Keel Style:  Cutaway Full or Fin Ventilation: adequate Alternate Sails: storm jib, drifter or asymmetrical spinnaker Maintenance:  well maintained with records
Ballast Type: Lead only Electrical: updated systems and wiring Sail Covers: main cover and bag for headsail Starter:  electric & manual
Cockpit: Small size, adequate drains, bridgedeck, watertight lazerette Access:  relatively accessible
Throughulls: all with seacocks, <10 total, Cooling Type:  , fresh water/antifreeze cooled
Hull:  No blisters, recent paint job
Rudder:  Skeg hung or attached to keel (no spade)
Something obvious we’re missing?  Please leave us a comment and let us know!